Ways to cut veneer

Browse Product Series. Stone is a new building product for most people, unlike more traditional mediums like wood, metal, concrete, and tile, so bridging that gap with easy to understand knowledge is something we know our customers appreciate.

The short answer is that stacked stone veneer panels are best cut using a combination of two tools — a wet saw designed to cut tile and stone, and a angle grinder for more precision and unique cuts.

A Tile Wet Saw with a continuous rim diamond blade is going to be your primary cutting tool for a stack stone veneer panel installation. A wet saw works on the concept of water being applied to the blade and to the tile or stone to provide lubrication as the blade cuts through. The water is typically recycled through a close loop system which allows for it to drain off the tile and into a reservoir where a small pump is located which cycles it back up to blade.

A continuous rim diamond blade sounds fancy, but its actually a fairly prevalent type of blade available at most hardware stores and certainly any tile and stone shop.

Diamonds are one of the hardest naturally occurring materials on earth and are exceptionally good with cutting through tile and stone. A tile wet saw will typically either have a stationary blade and a movable tray where the stacked stone veneer can be placed and then pushed through the blade.

Alternatively some saws have a fixed tray and a movable blade set up. Depending on the complexity of the cuts you need to make, tile saws can also have a blade that can be tilted, or a mount that can be fixed to the tray to allow for inside and outside miter cuts on stone veneer.

Either way, stone should cut nice and easy on a wet saw. Probably the most important thing to remember when cutting stacked stone veneer on a tile wet saw is safety. Eye protection is a must, and ear protection is a good idea as most units can get loud. Working with electricity and power in the same tool requires extra diligence as well, so be sure to read the instruction manual and plug the the saw into a grounded outlet.

Blades also will need replaced much more frequently as compared to the wet saw. Besides wearing eye and ear protection, heavy gloves are a great idea to protect hands and fingers from stone chunks and the blade itself.

How to Cut Veneers

Tile wet saws are very commonly available to rent at local hardware equipment rental locations at a reasonable charge. Thanks for learning more about the best ways to cut stacked stone veneer with us today!

We enjoy sharing the knowledge and passion we have about our products and how to install stacked stone correctly with our customers and anyone interested in knowing more. Norstone's New Dimensions in Natural Stone blog aims to discuss design themes, sources of inspiration, and how the world around us influences our creative interpretation and buying preferences.

At Norstone, our goal is simple: to make amazing natural stone veneer the way you want it. You get great quality service with a great quality product. We'll work tirelessly to create the project of your dreams, all in a timely manner, and all made using the highest quality natural stone materials from around the world.

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How to Cut Stone Veneer to Fit

View All Titles Norstone's New Dimensions in Natural Stone blog aims to discuss design themes, sources of inspiration, and how the world around us influences our creative interpretation and buying preferences. Share this Article Facebook Twitter. Why Norstone? All rights reserved.There are many ways to slice veneer and each method produces a unique look in the pattern of the grain.

Bohlke Veneer, we offer all the different slicing methods that are available. We also use exclusive production techniques and machines that we developed and patented. For example, we place flitches for slicing on special vacuum bed flitch tables, which hold the flitches securely in place using only by air suction.

The benefits for you are two-fold. First, you can count on superior quality veneer from M. Bohlke Veneer and second, our higher yields assure competitive pricing for your purchases. In rotary slicing, a whole round log is mounted on a lathe and turned against a blade. It is the most economical method of cutting. Veneer cut this way varies in pattern as it cuts through the successive layers of growth rings.

Rotary cut veneer can be wide enough to produce full-sheet single piece faces. This method, however, does not lend itself to creating matching faces, due to the inconsistency of the grain patterns. In order to achieve veneer sheet sequences, we score the log or burl at one point.

This produces sheets that begin wide and gradually get narrower as the blade cuts closer to the logs and burls heart.

For all veneers that will not be rotary sliced, the logs are sawn into halves, thirds, or quarters or more. With half round slicing, a half, third or quarter of a log is attached to a plate on a lathe and turned.

This method adds width to an otherwise narrow log by increasing the radius of the cut.

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Half-round slicing is used to accentuate the variegated grain in certain woods. However, it can also be used to achieve a flat- or plain-sliced veneer appearance. In plain slicing, the most common process for fancy veneer manufacturing, a half, third or quarter of a log the flitch is mounted on the vacuum flitch table with the heart away from the blade.

The cut is then made with the blade parallel to the length of the log. This cut of veneer is ideally suited for wall panels, doors and furniture because of the consistency in its grain, and the ability to match sequences of leaves. In order to achieve veneer with a very straight grain, quarter sliced veneer is often specified.

The quarter of a log is mounted on the vacuum flitch table so that the growth rings are perpendicular to the cutting blade. Quartered leaves are cut consecutively, are narrower than plain sliced, and are easily matched. This cut requires the largest diameter of logs.

ways to cut veneer

A quarter of the log is fixed to a plate on a turning stay log. As the flitch is rotated, the blade and angle can be varied so that the wood is cut exactly to produce the very straight rift grain. Most often, this method is used with oak. Other species such as rift-cut maple, walnut and cherry can be specified to be rift cut to achieve wider sheet widths. Since rift grain is generally the straightest and free from cathedrals and variations in grain, it is used to enhance verticality, and is easily sequenced and matched.

Latest News Careers Contact Us. Veneer Cuts. Here are the most common cutting styles for veneer production: Lathe Peeling or Full Round Rotary Slicing In rotary slicing, a whole round log is mounted on a lathe and turned against a blade. Half-Round Slicing With half round slicing, a half, third or quarter of a log is attached to a plate on a lathe and turned. Plain Slicing In plain slicing, the most common process for fancy veneer manufacturing, a half, third or quarter of a log the flitch is mounted on the vacuum flitch table with the heart away from the blade.

Quarter Slicing In order to achieve veneer with a very straight grain, quarter sliced veneer is often specified. Sign Up for our Newsletter.JavaScript seems to be disabled in your browser.

For the best experience on our site, be sure to turn on Javascript in your browser. If you've been wanting to tackle a wood veneering project, but haven't been sure how to get started, you've come to the right place. We put together this article where we'll give you a glimpse of the history of wood veneering, describe a few of veneering's most outstanding benefits, and describe the most common types of veneer and methods for applying veneer to a substrate.

What do you think of when you hear the word "veneer? On the other hand, if you were educated in the solid wood construction school of woodworking, you might think of veneering as low grade substitute for the "real thing. Veneering is simply a method for decorating the surface of one material with another more attractive material. In the hands of an expert, it can produce some of the most remarkable effects in woodworking, but there's also plenty of room for beginners.

Most veneering techniques, in fact, aren't all that complicated, and with just a few hand tools and with a little know-how you can have perfect results right from the beginning. The idea that no self-respecting woodworker would stoop to the "deceptive" practice of veneering is another unfortunate misconception.

Veneered surfaces made with modern techniques and materials are every bit as durable and attractive as solid wood, and in many situations veneering offers considerable advantages over solid wood construction. Substrates for veneer, for example, can be chosen for their dimensional stability and other construction properties rather than their appearance.

And once they actually know a little about veneering, most woodworkers come to see it as a respectable and extremely useful technique. Techniques for decorating wood with veneer have been around for a while.

Veneers of African ebony with inlays of ivory and other exotic materials were commonly used to decorate artifacts the Pharaohs planned to take with them into the afterlife beginning with the earliest dynasties - fragments of inlaid wood roughly 5, years old were found in King Semerkhet's tomb.

An extravagantly inlaid table presented to Julius Cesar by Cleopatra, and a citron table purchased by the Roman orator Cicero, which featured "veins arranged in waving lines to form spirals like small whirlpools," are two examples of the highly developed veneering techniques in practice over years ago.

In the seventeenth century, veneering took a major step forward with the development of better woodworking tools. And by the beginning of the eighteenth century, veneering began to take center stage when a shift in furniture making style replaced frame and panel construction with case and drawer construction, and surfaces of figured veneer were favored over shaped panels and carved surfaces.

Toward the end of the eighteenth century, veneering reached a high point in the meticulously inlaid neoclassical furniture of designers like George Hepplewhite and Thomas Sheraton. It was in the nineteenth century that veneering started to develop a bad reputation when some furniture manufacturers were using veneer mainly as a method of covering badly constructed furniture.

By the middle of the s, commercial furniture producers in America had grown into factory-type operations that weren't reliant on skilled cabinetmakers, and veneer was seen as a way to save on material costs more than as unique decorative technique.

To compound the problem, methods for producing the large amounts of veneer necessary for the level of furniture production that was going on were crude compared to the current state of the art. The result was thousands of pieces of cheaply constructed furniture with low quality veneered surfaces.

Veneer Cuts

Over the past few decades, wood veneering has been on the upswing. Veneering techniques and equipment have been perfected to the point where veneer is an extremely reliable choice for producing natural wood surfaces for furniture and cabinets.Since the stones will vary in size, before placing any of the stones take measurements of each area to be covered.

This will help with the overall installation by serving as a guide when the stones are cut. You can either cut all the stones in advance by working out a pattern, or you may prefer to do a section at a time. Lucie Rowe. Photo By: Lucie Rowe. The bluestone is scribed using a specialized saw and a carbide blade Image 1. Begin by marking a line down the stone. Continue the marked line across the edge, then flip the stone and continue the line on the other side of the stone.

Once you've marked the stone, carefully scribe along the marked line using the saw with the carbide blade Image 2. One way to ensure that the scribe is steady is to have someone hold it Image 3.

Once the scribed line has been made all the way around, the stone can be split along the scribed line with gentle taps of a chisel Images 1 and 2. Sign up for weekly project ideas and advice from experts. Privacy Policy.

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How To Rooms and Spaces Exterior. Remodel It. Measure for Stones Since the stones will vary in size, before placing any of the stones take measurements of each area to be covered. Scribe the Stone The bluestone is scribed using a specialized saw and a carbide blade Image 1. Split the Stone Once the scribed line has been made all the way around, the stone can be split along the scribed line with gentle taps of a chisel Images 1 and 2. How to Clean Granite Countertops.

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ways to cut veneer

Need some design inspiration?Veneer is a thin covering that is commonly used on top of another surface. It is made out of wood and is glued to another wood surface to give it a finished look. Veneer is smooth and has a flat surface.

How to apply wood veneer

Plywood is a little thicker and oftentimes is installed underneath the veneer. Cutting veneer is slightly different than cutting plywood, but it will almost always be necessary. Line up a T-square and draw a straight line with the marker along the cut location. Follow along the T-square with the marker down the entire piece of veneer.

Set the veneer on top of a flat surface. The plywood that also needs to be cut can be used as the surface. Run a sharp utility knife along the marker line and score the piece of veneer. Move back and forth along the same line until the utility knife has gone completely through the veneer. Pick up the veneer and carefully snap it in half by hand. Grip the veneer on both sides and break it apart.

Measure the cut piece and verify it is the proper size. Line up a T-square at the mark and draw a straight line over the mark with a black marker.

Line up a circular saw to the cut mark and turn on the saw. Adjust the blade of the saw so it is slightly deeper than the thickness of the plywood. Run the blade of the saw along the cut line.

Continue straight through the plywood with the saw until it has been cut in two. Measure the plywood and verify the proper cut was made.

Set the veneer on top of the plywood and compare the sizes. Check that they are the same size and that the veneer fits over the plywood perfectly. He graduated in from The Ohio State University with a bachelor's degree in public affairs journalism. Hunker may earn compensation through affiliate links in this story. Warning Always wear safety goggles when working with a circular saw. Step 2 Set the veneer on top of a flat surface. Step 3 Pick up the veneer and carefully snap it in half by hand.

Step 2 Line up a circular saw to the cut mark and turn on the saw. Step 3 Measure the plywood and verify the proper cut was made.

ways to cut veneer

Share this article. Alexander Callos. Show Comments.Rotary cutting is a method used to peel a log into thin sheets of wood as if unrolled from a spool, like paper towels.

Rotary cut veneer has a variegated grain appearance and can vary tremendously, although it is the preferred method to obtain large sections of wood to manufacture whole piece faces in standard and oversize structural marine grade panels. It is usually the least expensive veneer style. Quarter slicing also known as Quarter Sawn, Quarter Cut or Quartered is a cutting method that involves dividing the log into quarters and slicing the quarter log on a radial direction approximately perpendicular to the growth rings to produce a straight grain appearance with the flake from the wood rays typically exaggerated on the surface.

It is commonly used with red and white oaks because of the desired flake effect but may be used on any species. Avoiding the flake effect and obtaining tighter grain appearance calls for a rift cut. Rift cut veneer is commonly produced in the various species of Oak. Oak has medullary ray cells which radiate from the center of the log like the curved spokes of a wheel.

Plain slicing also known as Plain Sawn or Flat Cut a log produces thin veneers that are no wider than the log and have a pronounced repeating grain pattern. The individual components are spliced together employing one of a number of matching techniques. The most common is book matching, which requires reversing every other component as if you were opening the pages of a book. The result is a mirror image at the splice line.

Slip matching involves splicing each veneer to the next without turning over any component. Running match will be provided unless otherwise specified. Because of final panel trimming, the outer components of both balance and center matched faces will be slightly narrower than the other components.

Conventional means of peeling or slicing a log results in the development of minute fractures known as lathe checks on the side of the veneer adjacent to the knife and closer to the center of the log as the veneer was cut.

The side of the veneer having the lathe checks is the loose side, while the opposite side is the tight side. A calibrated panel is typically a veneer core panel whose core was produced in a separate step and sanded to strict thickness tolerances before the outer decorative veneers are applied. Natural variation such as density, moisture absorption, and physical properties, combined with manufacturing variation results in thickness fluctuations in all wood panels.

Veneer core typically has more potential thickness variation than engineered cores. A calibrated panel is designed to provide even tighter tolerance restrictions. What are the different wood veneer cut types? Rotary Cut Rotary cutting is a method used to peel a log into thin sheets of wood as if unrolled from a spool, like paper towels.

Quarter Cut Quarter slicing also known as Quarter Sawn, Quarter Cut or Quartered is a cutting method that involves dividing the log into quarters and slicing the quarter log on a radial direction approximately perpendicular to the growth rings to produce a straight grain appearance with the flake from the wood rays typically exaggerated on the surface. Rift Cut Rift cut veneer is commonly produced in the various species of Oak. Plain Sliced Plain slicing also known as Plain Sawn or Flat Cut a log produces thin veneers that are no wider than the log and have a pronounced repeating grain pattern.

Slip Matching Slip matching involves splicing each veneer to the next without turning over any component. Tight Side and Loose Side Conventional means of peeling or slicing a log results in the development of minute fractures known as lathe checks on the side of the veneer adjacent to the knife and closer to the center of the log as the veneer was cut.Decorating wood with veneers has been around for thousands of years.

Veneers of African ebony with inlays of ivory and other exotic materials were commonly used to decorate artifacts of the Pharaohs in Egypt years ago. Over the centuries and especially over the past few decades, wood veneering has been on the upswing. Today veneering techniques and equipment have been perfected to the point where veneer is an extremely reliable choice for producing natural wood surfaces for furniture and cabinets.

Veneer is used to cover an existing material with a new surface. For example, the top layer of wood in a plywood is a veneer. With modern technology veneers can be cut as thin as a piece of paper.

Today veneer is a way to make expensive wood cover a larger area for an economical cost. Wood veneers are easy to apply but do require some knowledge, tools, skills, and time.

In this article we will cover some basic things about wood veneers and we will show you how to apply wood veneer yourself. The first distinction between wood veneers is in the way that they are cut. There are several different ways of cutting veneer and we will try to explain the most common ones. A natural distribution of ray flake is a characteristic of this cut in red and white oak. Quarter Sawn wood veneers can be produced with many wood species and has a linear grain outcome.

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Plain sliced veneer have cathedral or straight grain patterns. Rift grain veneer is restricted to red and white oak only. The log is mounted centrally in the lathe and turned against a razor sharp blade.

The second distinction between wood veneers is in the preparation for application. There are four different types of wood veneers: thin-cut wood, paper backed sheets, pre-glued-peel-and-stick sheets and wood glued to wood sheets.

Thin-cut wood veneer is as it comes from the log and that is the old fashioned tried and true way. Paper backed sheets are wood veneers with paper glued to the backside.

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Peel-and-stick wood veneers or PSA pressure sensitive adhesive is available on veneer sheets as a means to simplify the installation. Real wood-on-wood veneer has a layer of wood with the grain running cross-ways glued to a layer with the grain running long-ways. There are many different ways for applying wood veneers and we will explain four most common methods: hammer veneering, veneering with hydraulic press, veneering with vacuum press and veneering with contact cement.


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